Top News in Australia

Records Found in Dusty Basement Undermine Decades of Dietary Advice

Scientificamerican.com / Sharon Begley - - Reading time 8 mins - Share :
Raw data from a 40-year-old study raises new questions about fats

Study defines thunderstorm asthma epidemic conditions

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 1 mins - Share :
Ads from Inoreader • Remove As allergy sufferers can attest, thunderstorm activity can exacerbate asthma and res...

Cross-Sample Sequencing Contamination Galore

The Scientist - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
Scientists conducting a large-scale, comparative transcriptomics project have inadvertently highlighted widespread contamination in sequencing data.

More multiple sclerosis-causing mutations found in Canadian families

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Less than a year after publishing research identifying a single genetic mutation that caused multiple sclerosis (MS) in two Canadian families, scientists at the University of British Columbia have found a combination of two other mutations in another family that made them highly susceptible to th...

Destroy diabetes with a diet that encourages gut bacteria

Naturalnews.com / Russel Davis - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
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Aggression linked to media violence in 7 cultures

Futurity / Angie Hunt-Iowa State - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Ads from Inoreader • Remove Six decades of research suggest the effect of media violence on aggressive behavior ...
More from Medical Xpress
Medical Xpress - Cross-cultural study strengthens link between media violence and aggressive behavior

Controversial scientist claims heating up your tea in the MICROWAVE will make it healthier

Naturalnews.com / Tracey Watson - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
(Natural News) Dr. Quan Vuong of the University of Newcastle in Australia, has made a controversial claim that has tea lovers the world over voicing their feelings on social media and elsewhere. Dr. Vuong, who investigates ways to improve the nutritional value of natural products, says that the h...

'Poppers' might permanently damage your eyes

Popular Science / Rachel Feltman - - Reading time 4 mins - Share :
Ads from Inoreader • Remove Health More evidence that the harmless high isn't quite harmless ...
More from Medical Xpress, Live Science
Live Science - Why Inhaled 'Poppers' May Cause Eye Damage
Medical Xpress - New chemical composition of 'poppers' linked to retinal damage

Plotting the demise of Alzheimer's: New study is major test for power of early action

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 6 mins - Share :
Ads from Inoreader • Remove Catch it early. Those are watchwords in the battle against a host of illnesses, from...

Better than vaccines? Vitamin D found to be powerful prevention vs. colds and flu

Naturalnews.com / Earl Garcia - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
(Natural News) Researchers at the Queen Mary University of London found that vitamin D supplementation keep respiratory diseases such as cough and colds at bay. Data show that vitamin D supplementation resulted in a 12 percent reduction in the proportion of patients suffering at least one acu...

Cross-Sample Sequencing Contamination Galore

The Scientist - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
Ads from Inoreader • Remove Scientists conducting a large-scale, comparative transcriptomics project have inadve...

High fat, high sugar diet during pregnancy 'programs' for health complications

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 4 mins - Share :
Ads from Inoreader • Remove Eating a high fat and high sugar diet when pregnant leads to metabolic impairments i...

Cheap stroke drug boosts pancreatic cancer survival in mice

New Scientist - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
A drug used in Asia for decades to treat strokes has been found to soften the armour of pancreatic tumours, making them vulnerable to chemotherapy
More from Medical Xpress
Medical Xpress - A one-two punch hits pancreatic cancer where it hurts

Ultrasound and drug research holds promise for Alzheimer's disease

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 1 mins - Share :
Non-invasive ultrasound improves the delivery to the brain of a therapeutic antibody targeting Alzheimer's disease, University of Queensland researchers have found.
More from The Guardian
The Guardian / Australian Associated Press - Alzheimer’s: ultrasound safely delivers drugs to damaged brains of mice

One-Quarter of Colorectal Cancers Linked to Lifestyle

Live Science - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Lifestyle factors including smoking and eating red meat may cause one-quarter of colorectal cancer cases, a new study from Australia finds.

Risk prediction models for selection of lung cancer screening candidates: A retrospective validation study

PLOS Blogs / Kevin ten Haaf - - Reading time 31 mins - Share :
Ads from Inoreader • Remove by Kevin ten Haaf, Jihyoun Jeon, Martin C. Tammemägi, Summer S. Han, Chung Yin Kong...

Where you live could determine risk of heart attack, stroke or dying of heart disease

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
People living in parts of Ontario with better access to preventive health care had lower rates of cardiac events compared to residents of regions with less access, found a new study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Doctors turn to a spider's deadly venom in hopes of treating stroke victims

Naturalnews.com / Rhonda Johansson - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
(Natural News) The venom of one of the world’s deadliest spiders could potentially be used by stroke patients to protect against brain damage — although more research is needed before this becomes standard treatment. One bite from the Australian funnel web spider can kill an average-sized hu...

HONEY: Is this ancient medicinal food the key to fighting deadly drug-resistant infections?

Naturalnews.com / Gregory Van Dyke - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
(Natural News) Exotic honey can be used as a powerful alternative when treating one of the deadliest infections in the U.S. today. A report published in the International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents confirms that exotic honey can battle antibiotic-resistant infections, like Clostridium dif...

Why The Newly Proposed Sepsis Treatment Needs More Study

NPR / Richard Harris - - Reading time 5 mins - Share :
The bodywide inflammation known as sepsis kills about 300,000 people in U.S. hospitals each year. Promising treatments have come and gone, warn skeptical doctors, who call for rigorous research.(Image credit: Sukiyashi/Getty Images/iStockphoto)
More from NPR
NPR / Richard Harris - Doctor Turns Up Possible Treatment For Deadly Sepsis

Australia about to ban unvaccinated children from preschools and daycare

Naturalnews.com / Vicki Batts - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
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High fibre diet 'could prevent type 1 diabetes'

The Guardian / Ian Sample Science editor - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
Ads from Inoreader • Remove Animal trials hint that short-chain fatty acids produced by a fibre-rich diet could ...

Major pancreatic cancer study launched

BBC - - Reading time 1 mins - Share :
A new pancreatic cancer project is to find ways to speed up scientific discovery to improve the survival rates of patients.

Is a new 'nanodote' the next big thing in snakebite treatment? Not yet.

Discover Magazine - - Reading time < 1 mins - Share :
Living in countries like the U.S., Australia, and the U.K., it can be all too easy to forget that snakebites are a serious and neglected global medical problem. It's estimated that upwards of 4.5 million people are envenomated by snakes every year; about half of them suffer serious injuries i...

Aboriginal hair shows 50,000 year connection to Australia

ScienceDaily - - Reading time < 1 mins - Share :
DNA in hair samples collected from Aboriginal people across Australia in the early to mid-1900s has revealed that populations have been continuously present in the same regions for up to 50,000 years -- soon after the peopling of Australia.

High variability among experts when assessing claimants for work disability benefits

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 1 mins - Share :
Healthcare professionals have high variation in judgement when assessing the same claimant for disability benefits, finds a review published by The BMJ today.

An Early First Menstrual Period May Lead To Premature Menopause

NPR / Jessica Boddy - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Having a first period by age 11 and never having children were both associated with premature menopause, which this study defines as menopause by age 40.(Image credit: Getty Images)
More from Telegraph
Telegraph / Sarah Knapton - Women who go through puberty before 12 more likely to suffer early menopause

Huntsman scientists identify bone degradation process within metastatic breast cancer

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
Once breast cancer spreads through the body, it can degrade a patient's healthy bones, causing numerous problems. Scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah have identified a new way that bones get destroyed through cancer. And they've also learned how to block that d...

Deep brain stimulation studies in Alzheimer's disease pose ethical challenges

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
Promising, early studies of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease have paved a path for future clinical trials, but there are unique ethical challenges with this vulnerable population regarding decision making and post-study treatment access that need to be address...

Organ trafficking

BBC - - Reading time 5 mins - Share :
Alert raised after patients from UK, Canada and Australia develop complications following kidney transplants.

High-Sugar Diet Makes Flies Drop Like...Flies

Scientificamerican.com / Karen Hopkin - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
A study examines the effects of a high-sugar diet on the life spans of fruit flies. Another studies how the flies’ appetite-suppressing pathways may be similar to ours. Karen Hopkin...

The chemo’s too much, but getting on a clinical trial is gruelling enough

The Guardian / Steve Hewlett - - Reading time 6 mins - Share :
Continuing his account of his illness, Steve Hewlett suffers a setback as he waits nervously for new drugsNow sharp-eyed readers may have spotted that this diary starts the day before the last one was published! By way of a little back story, my doctors have been trying to get me on to a clinical...

Week in Review: January 9?13

The Scientist - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Assessing marijuana research; epigenetics and genetic ancestry; producing stem cells with extra-embryonic potential; aging-related changes in glial cell gene expression; plant-soil feedback

PLOS ONE 10 Year Anniversary: Staff Editors’ Favorites

PLOS Blogs / PLOS Collections - - Reading time 7 mins - Share :
0000-0002-8715-2896Source: PLOS ONE 10 Year Anniversary: Staff Editors’ Favorites AddThis Sharing Buttons above In the first of the PLOS ONE 10th Anniversary Collections, the Staff Editors of the journal have each chosen their favorite PLOS ONE article

Why mums and babies prefer to keep to one side of each other

New Scientist - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Mothers prefer to hold children on the left, and animal young prefer to approach their mother from one side, too. Asymmetry in the brain may explain why

Screen time guidelines need to be built on evidence, not hype

The Guardian / Guardian Staff - - Reading time 7 mins - Share :
Open letter: There is an important debate to be had about screen time, but we need quality research and evidence to support itMoral panic about the impact of new technologies on our behaviour and development is not new. Socrates railed against the dangers of writing for fear that it would nurture...

Simple blood test can detect genetic diseases early in pregnancy

New Scientist - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
Ads from Inoreader • Remove Together, single-gene disorders are more common than Down’s syndrome. Now there’...

Australia bans non-prescription codeine to fight opioid crisis

New Scientist - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Codeine-related deaths have doubled in Australia since 2000. The country is following the US by making codeine prescription only, but the UK has no such plans

Unexpected Risks Found In Editing Genes To Prevent Inherited Disorders

NPR / Jill Neimark - - Reading time 10 mins - Share :
Ads from Inoreader • Remove In 2016, scientists combined the genes of three people in an effort to make a baby f...

Researchers confirm link between vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy and autism traits

Naturalnews.com / Robert Jonathan - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
(NaturalNews) A published study by researchers in Australia suggests that insufficient vitamin D levels among pregnant women may increase the likelihood of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in their children. Moreover, vitamin D supplements may be able to reduce the autism risk, according to the sam...

The Subclonal Architecture of Metastatic Breast Cancer: Results from a Prospective Community-Based Rapid Autopsy Program “CASCADE”

PLOS Blogs / Peter Savas - - Reading time 22 mins - Share :
by Peter Savas, Zhi Ling Teo, Christophe Lefevre, Christoffer Flensburg, Franco Caramia, Kathryn Alsop, Mariam Mansour, Prudence A. Francis, Heather A. Thorne, Maria Joao Silva, Nnennaya Kanu, Michelle Dietzen, Andrew Rowan, Maik Kschischo, Stephen Fox, David D. Bowtell, Sarah-Jane Dawson, Terenc...