Top News in Australia

Scanning your brain can predict what will happen in the future

New Scientist - - Reading time 4 mins - Share :
Can neuroforecasting predict the next election result or market crash? Analysing activity in a part of our brain can predict things that haven’t happened yet

Antarctic mystery microbe could tell us where viruses came from

New Scientist - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Viruses are not like other organisms and nobody is quite sure where they originated, but a newly discovered single-celled organism seems to offer a clue

Data revealed under FOI shows benefits of multiple sclerosis drug currently blocked by regulators

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
A drug that is blocked by the EU regulatory system has now been found to improve the quality of life of people with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).
More from ScienceDaily
ScienceDaily - Data revealed under FOI shows benefits of MS drug currently blocked by regulators

Common over-the-counter ibuprofen found to be more effective against depression than dangerous antidepressant drugs

Naturalnews.com / Jhoanna Robinson - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
(Natural News) A complaint of depression to your general practitioner would likely result in you getting a prescription for an antidepressant. This doesn’t take into consideration the fact that there has been evidence that showed that around 30 to 40 percent of people with depression also had...

If you have cracked lips and brittle nails, you may be severely deficient in this almost miraculous vitamin

Naturalnews.com / Jhoanna Robinson - - Reading time 4 mins - Share :
(Natural News) There is another supervitamin that slips by even the most health-conscious of people, vitamin B complex. According to Rob Hobson, registered nutritionist and head of nutrition at Britain-based health supplement supplier Healthspan, they comprise of the following: thiamin (vitamin B...

Data sharing: do scientists know best?

Nature - - Reading time < 1 mins - Share :

How One Bodybuilder Died from Drinking Too Many Protein Shakes

Live Science - - Reading time < 1 mins - Share :
A 25-year-old woman in Australia died after consuming too much protein, in the form of shakes, supplements and protein-packed foods, the New York Post reported yesterday.

Human intrusion on fruit bat habitats raises exposure risk to Hendra virus in Australia

ScienceDaily - - Reading time < 1 mins - Share :
There is a rising risk of human and domestic animal exposure to deadly Hendra virus (HeV) carried by fruit bats in Eastern Australia due to human intrusion into their habitats, human proximity to woodlands and vegetation loss, a new study reveals.

Viruses up their game in arms race with immune system

ScienceDaily - - Reading time < 1 mins - Share :
Myxoma virus -- introduced to control the rabbit population in Australia in 1950 -- has developed a deadly ability to suppress the immune response in host rabbits. This example of an evolutionary arms race highlights the potential for escalating virus virulence and host resistance to produce more...

Men, Listen Up: Women Like The Smell Of Guys Who Eat A Certain Diet

NPR / Allison Aubrey - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
Your diet can influence your appearance. You knew that. But did you know that what you eat can also affect your body odor and your attractiveness to the opposite sex?(Image credit: Lilli Carré for NPR)

Arrival of modern humans in Southeast Asia questioned

ScienceDaily - - Reading time < 1 mins - Share :
Ads from Inoreader • Remove Humans may have exited out of Africa and arrived in Southeast Asia 20,000 years earl...

You Thought Your Braces Hurt? This Woman's Dental Wire Tore Through Her Gut

Live Science - - Reading time < 1 mins - Share :
A woman in Australia had a dental wire in her digestive system for 10 years before doctors discovered it tearing through her abdomen.

What Do You Do with a 26-Pound Diseased Liver? Donate It to a Medical School

Live Science - - Reading time < 1 mins - Share :
A medical school in Queensland, Australia, was the recent recipient of a big donation: a diseased liver that weighed more than 26 lbs.

RNA-Seq Reveals Previously Hidden, Genetic DisorderCausing Mutations

The Scientist - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
Ads from Inoreader • Remove Adding RNA sequencing analysis to genomic sequencing helps scientists uncover mutati...

Records Found in Dusty Basement Undermine Decades of Dietary Advice

Scientificamerican.com / Sharon Begley - - Reading time 8 mins - Share :
Raw data from a 40-year-old study raises new questions about fats

Study defines thunderstorm asthma epidemic conditions

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 1 mins - Share :
Ads from Inoreader • Remove As allergy sufferers can attest, thunderstorm activity can exacerbate asthma and res...

Cross-Sample Sequencing Contamination Galore

The Scientist - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
Scientists conducting a large-scale, comparative transcriptomics project have inadvertently highlighted widespread contamination in sequencing data.

More multiple sclerosis-causing mutations found in Canadian families

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Less than a year after publishing research identifying a single genetic mutation that caused multiple sclerosis (MS) in two Canadian families, scientists at the University of British Columbia have found a combination of two other mutations in another family that made them highly susceptible to th...

Destroy diabetes with a diet that encourages gut bacteria

Naturalnews.com / Russel Davis - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
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Aggression linked to media violence in 7 cultures

Futurity / Angie Hunt-Iowa State - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Ads from Inoreader • Remove Six decades of research suggest the effect of media violence on aggressive behavior ...
More from Medical Xpress
Medical Xpress - Cross-cultural study strengthens link between media violence and aggressive behavior

Controversial scientist claims heating up your tea in the MICROWAVE will make it healthier

Naturalnews.com / Tracey Watson - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
(Natural News) Dr. Quan Vuong of the University of Newcastle in Australia, has made a controversial claim that has tea lovers the world over voicing their feelings on social media and elsewhere. Dr. Vuong, who investigates ways to improve the nutritional value of natural products, says that the h...

'Poppers' might permanently damage your eyes

Popular Science / Rachel Feltman - - Reading time 4 mins - Share :
Ads from Inoreader • Remove Health More evidence that the harmless high isn't quite harmless ...
More from Medical Xpress, Live Science
Live Science - Why Inhaled 'Poppers' May Cause Eye Damage
Medical Xpress - New chemical composition of 'poppers' linked to retinal damage

Plotting the demise of Alzheimer's: New study is major test for power of early action

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 6 mins - Share :
Ads from Inoreader • Remove Catch it early. Those are watchwords in the battle against a host of illnesses, from...

Better than vaccines? Vitamin D found to be powerful prevention vs. colds and flu

Naturalnews.com / Earl Garcia - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
(Natural News) Researchers at the Queen Mary University of London found that vitamin D supplementation keep respiratory diseases such as cough and colds at bay. Data show that vitamin D supplementation resulted in a 12 percent reduction in the proportion of patients suffering at least one acu...

Cross-Sample Sequencing Contamination Galore

The Scientist - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
Ads from Inoreader • Remove Scientists conducting a large-scale, comparative transcriptomics project have inadve...

High fat, high sugar diet during pregnancy 'programs' for health complications

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 4 mins - Share :
Ads from Inoreader • Remove Eating a high fat and high sugar diet when pregnant leads to metabolic impairments i...

Cheap stroke drug boosts pancreatic cancer survival in mice

New Scientist - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
A drug used in Asia for decades to treat strokes has been found to soften the armour of pancreatic tumours, making them vulnerable to chemotherapy
More from Medical Xpress
Medical Xpress - A one-two punch hits pancreatic cancer where it hurts

Ultrasound and drug research holds promise for Alzheimer's disease

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 1 mins - Share :
Non-invasive ultrasound improves the delivery to the brain of a therapeutic antibody targeting Alzheimer's disease, University of Queensland researchers have found.
More from The Guardian
The Guardian / Australian Associated Press - Alzheimer’s: ultrasound safely delivers drugs to damaged brains of mice

One-Quarter of Colorectal Cancers Linked to Lifestyle

Live Science - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Lifestyle factors including smoking and eating red meat may cause one-quarter of colorectal cancer cases, a new study from Australia finds.

Risk prediction models for selection of lung cancer screening candidates: A retrospective validation study

PLOS Blogs / Kevin ten Haaf - - Reading time 31 mins - Share :
Ads from Inoreader • Remove by Kevin ten Haaf, Jihyoun Jeon, Martin C. Tammemägi, Summer S. Han, Chung Yin Kong...

Where you live could determine risk of heart attack, stroke or dying of heart disease

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
People living in parts of Ontario with better access to preventive health care had lower rates of cardiac events compared to residents of regions with less access, found a new study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Doctors turn to a spider's deadly venom in hopes of treating stroke victims

Naturalnews.com / Rhonda Johansson - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
(Natural News) The venom of one of the world’s deadliest spiders could potentially be used by stroke patients to protect against brain damage — although more research is needed before this becomes standard treatment. One bite from the Australian funnel web spider can kill an average-sized hu...

HONEY: Is this ancient medicinal food the key to fighting deadly drug-resistant infections?

Naturalnews.com / Gregory Van Dyke - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
(Natural News) Exotic honey can be used as a powerful alternative when treating one of the deadliest infections in the U.S. today. A report published in the International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents confirms that exotic honey can battle antibiotic-resistant infections, like Clostridium dif...

Why The Newly Proposed Sepsis Treatment Needs More Study

NPR / Richard Harris - - Reading time 5 mins - Share :
The bodywide inflammation known as sepsis kills about 300,000 people in U.S. hospitals each year. Promising treatments have come and gone, warn skeptical doctors, who call for rigorous research.(Image credit: Sukiyashi/Getty Images/iStockphoto)
More from NPR
NPR / Richard Harris - Doctor Turns Up Possible Treatment For Deadly Sepsis

Australia about to ban unvaccinated children from preschools and daycare

Naturalnews.com / Vicki Batts - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
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High fibre diet 'could prevent type 1 diabetes'

The Guardian / Ian Sample Science editor - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
Ads from Inoreader • Remove Animal trials hint that short-chain fatty acids produced by a fibre-rich diet could ...

Major pancreatic cancer study launched

BBC - - Reading time 1 mins - Share :
A new pancreatic cancer project is to find ways to speed up scientific discovery to improve the survival rates of patients.

Is a new 'nanodote' the next big thing in snakebite treatment? Not yet.

Discover Magazine - - Reading time < 1 mins - Share :
Living in countries like the U.S., Australia, and the U.K., it can be all too easy to forget that snakebites are a serious and neglected global medical problem. It's estimated that upwards of 4.5 million people are envenomated by snakes every year; about half of them suffer serious injuries i...

Aboriginal hair shows 50,000 year connection to Australia

ScienceDaily - - Reading time < 1 mins - Share :
DNA in hair samples collected from Aboriginal people across Australia in the early to mid-1900s has revealed that populations have been continuously present in the same regions for up to 50,000 years -- soon after the peopling of Australia.

High variability among experts when assessing claimants for work disability benefits

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 1 mins - Share :
Healthcare professionals have high variation in judgement when assessing the same claimant for disability benefits, finds a review published by The BMJ today.

An Early First Menstrual Period May Lead To Premature Menopause

NPR / Jessica Boddy - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Having a first period by age 11 and never having children were both associated with premature menopause, which this study defines as menopause by age 40.(Image credit: Getty Images)
More from Telegraph
Telegraph / Sarah Knapton - Women who go through puberty before 12 more likely to suffer early menopause